Sask. Science Centre’s Towers of Tomorrow opening June 10 after delay



Sask. Science Centre’s Towers of Tomorrow opening June 10 after delay

After a delay caused by pandemic restrictions, the exhibit featuring some of the world’s famous towers in a 1:200 scale is now set to open.

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Albeit a bit later than planned, the Saskatchewan Science Centre plans to reopen its second floor along with a new, featured visiting exhibition: Towers of Tomorrow with LEGO® Bricks.

The centre was originally poised to launch the exhibit on April 2 but was forced to shut down before that could happen as cases of COVID-19, driven largely by variants of concern, surged in Regina. Public health orders at that time shuttered an array of services, including museums, art venues, libraries and science centres.

The exhibition is now slated to open to the public on June 10.

It includes what the centre describes as “some of the most iconic and eye-popping towers from across the world including Toronto’s CN Tower, Los Angeles’ Wilshire Grand Center, Chicago’s Willis Tower, Atlanta’s Bank of America Plaza, New York City’s famous landmarks the Empire State Building and Chrysler Building, Kuala Lumpur’s twin Petronas Towers, and much more.”

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According to a news release, the towers are constructed “with breathtaking architectural detail and accuracy by Australia’s Ryan McNaught, the only certified LEGO® professional in the Southern Hemisphere.” They are built on a scale of 1:200.

In addition, more than 200,000 cleaned and disinfected LEGO bricks will be available on site so visitors can also craft creations.

The second floor of the Saskatchewan Science Centre has been closed since March 13, 2020 to allow for a re-design, which includes removal of the Space Stadium Stage, new flooring and paint, and a revamped Richardson Ag-grow-land exhibit.

Leader-Post photo journalist Brandon Harder had a chance to shoot the Towers of Tomorrow exhibit just prior to when it was expected to open the first time. Here’s some of what he saw:

A section of the 1:200 scale model of Toronto’s CN Tower.
A section of the 1:200 scale model of Toronto’s CN Tower. Photo by BRANDON HARDER /Regina Leader-Post
A 1:200 scale model of Toronto’s CN Tower.
A 1:200 scale model of Toronto’s CN Tower. Photo by BRANDON HARDER /Regina Leader-Post
A 1:200 scale model of the Shanghai Tower.
A 1:200 scale model of the Shanghai Tower. Photo by BRANDON HARDER /Regina Leader-Post
A 1:200 scale model of the Tokyo Skytree.
A 1:200 scale model of the Tokyo Skytree. Photo by BRANDON HARDER /Regina Leader-Post
Sandy Baumgartner, CEO of the Saskatchewan Science Centre, sits in front of a display of model buildings built with Lego blocks back in March this year.
Sandy Baumgartner, CEO of the Saskatchewan Science Centre, sits in front of a display of model buildings built with Lego blocks back in March this year. Photo by BRANDON HARDER /Regina Leader-Post
A 1:200 scale model of the Willis Tower in Chicago.
A 1:200 scale model of the Willis Tower in Chicago. Photo by BRANDON HARDER /Regina Leader-Post
A 1:200 scale model of the International Commerce Centre.
A 1:200 scale model of the International Commerce Centre. Photo by BRANDON HARDER /Regina Leader-Post
A detail shot of a 1:200 scale model of the Burj Khalifa showing balcony decorations.
A detail shot of a 1:200 scale model of the Burj Khalifa showing balcony decorations. Photo by BRANDON HARDER /Regina Leader-Post
Sandy Baumgartner, CEO of the Saskatchewan Science Centre, stands in front of a display of model buildings built with Lego blocks, as part of the exhibition Towers of Tomorrow within the centre ion Mar. 25, 2021.
Sandy Baumgartner, CEO of the Saskatchewan Science Centre, stands in front of a display of model buildings built with Lego blocks, as part of the exhibition Towers of Tomorrow within the centre ion Mar. 25, 2021. Photo by BRANDON HARDER /Regina Leader-Post